MADISON — Sophomore wide receiver and potential breakout player Quintez Cephus is facing something nobody should have to go through.

On April 4, one day after Cephus’s father, Andre Taylor, was rushed to an Atlanta hospital following a gunshot wound to the head, Taylor passed away. Cephus flew to Atlanta as soon as possible to be with his family and was able to say goodbye to his father.

Today, April 11, Cephus is with his family attending the service in memory of his father.

In an incredibly trying time such as this, players and staff have both stepped up to support their teammate and friend. Ted Gilmore, wide receivers coach for the Badgers, accompanied Cephus to Georgia soon after getting the news. Gilmore emphasized that the decision was easy given the circumstances.

“I volunteered to do it,” Coach Gilmore said. “I felt he needed the support, it wasn’t anything we had to think about long.”

Gilmore tragically knows exactly what Cephus is dealing with. Gilmore lost his father as a junior in college, and, as such, wants to be there to comfort and guide Cephus, all while giving him his due space.

“Unfortunately, a young man at that age is taking on more responsibility than he should have to.”

When asked whether Cephus would be at a disadvantage missing practice, Gilmore was firm in saying how important it was for Cephus to take the time he needs, and his fellow coaches agree.

“There’s no pressure from that standpoint. The staff is 100% behind him…Coach [Chryst] made it very clear: ‘You do what you have to do.’”

Cephus had been impressing in practice, and was looking more and more like a great compliment to Jazz Peavy for the Badger offense.

“The game was starting to slow down for him a bit, if he made a mistake he could tell you why, as opposed to a year ago when he couldn’t,” Gilmore said.

Gilmore is more than confident he’ll be able to get Cephus up to speed, and in the mean time, he’s focused on giving Cephus all he needs.

“When they get here, they’re part of the family, so we gotta act accordingly.”

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